Girl Effect: Ni Nyampinga

The economic theory around empowering girls
to break the cycle of poverty in the developing
world is one of the most important doctrines
to have emerged in the last twenty years.

Building on this, the Nike Foundation
in conjunction with the UK Department for
International Development, set out with a mission
to develop a unique way of igniting change.

Brief
We were tasked with leading this campaign and building
a brand to create a positive cultural shift within
Rwandan culture. Our challenge was to answer the following:
What story could we tell, and in what way, to spread messages
of empowerment to affect positive, lasting behavioural change?

Approach
In all of our work, we take a bottom-up approach to building
tailor-made solutions. For this project, our mission was to listen,
observe and curate the most relevant storytelling methods
to inspire, educate and empower girls to rise from poverty.

After conducting various workshops, and working side-by-side
with local artists, it was clear that to achieve the goals
of this campaign, Ni Nyampinga would demand a radical shift
in design practice from anything that had gone before.
Solution

'Challenge set perceptions
that showcased female role models'




We created a brand identity that borrowed from traditional
craft and injected it with a bold and modern palette
and typeface. We developed guidelines to challenge set
perceptions that showcased female role models, and ensured
the publication offered new skills and advice about education,
sexual health and violence otherwise inaccessible.

While we led the first issue hands on, we mentored a local design
agency to take over the running of the magazine day-to-day.



We challenged them to think conceptually
around the issues presented and bring these
to life by creating a bright, open and inviting
movement all would want to be a part of.




After a year of operation, the campaign received support
from the Rwandan Education Board, and following, we knew
it was time to embrace new tools to further amplify this message.
We engaged with local radio and created a billboard campaign.

This was the biggest test for the branding we had created – was it
iconic and memorable enough for people to instantly recognise?
Result

'Ni Nyampinga is a more widely known brand

than Coca-Cola, with 41% of the local population

engaging with it regularly.'




Not only did we create the first ever colour magazine
in Rwandan history, with circulation sitting at 100,000 copies
printed per issue, but five years on, Ni Nyampinga is a more
widely known brand than Coca-Cola, with 41% of the local
population engaging with it regularly.

As with any successful brand, when momentum becomes
so great, soon comes the time to go ‘in house.’
In 2015, we assisted with the creation of a Ni Nyampinga
house to do this. We worked with a local printing house
and helped organise a government loan to purchase
a press capable of the magazine, and are happy to say
the magazine is now a self-sustaining entity.

As a small industry brag, this project also picked
up a Nike Maxim Award 2012 and was the first
ever non-Nike project to do so.

From the start, the ambition with this campaign was to spur
a hotbed of creativity and training for Rwanda’s girls
and to do ourselves “out of a job.” That we have now done this,
and curated Rwanda’s first girl teen brand for girls,
by girls, is a job well done.



Nike Russia House of Innovation

The event would attract a large number
of guests, and due to the high number of traffic,
our challenge was to design a premium space
that would feel both personal and seamless.
In addition, we needed to maximise retail sales
and create various zones that would
inspire social media coverage.

Brief
In early 2015, as part of the global NTC tour,
HarrimanSteel was approached by the Nike Russia team
to produce an original design concept for it's very own
House of Innovation.

This two-storey temporary brand experience and retail space,
on the edges of Moscow's infamous Gorky Park,
needed to host a wide range of participants, from professional
athletes and bloggers, to shoppers and media professionals.

In addition, it needed to function as a multi-purpose space,
featuring a pop-up retail floor, a VIP lounge,
and an exclusive ‘Nike Real Girls’ space with a nail bar,
photo area and café space.
Solution

'Focusing on a high level of detailing

and patterns, and using layering'




Taking inspiration from the Nike product itself, we chose
to use monochrome technical materials and fabrics
for all bespoke fixtures, focusing on a high level
of detailing and patterns, and using layering to exaggerate
the transparency of materials.

To allow the product to shine through, we chose concrete
and monochrome as a minimalist base to create a premium
aesthetic for the entire ground floor which acted
as a dedicated pop-up retail space.

We used transparencies, diffusers and semi-opaque materials
in the fabrication of displays to create a feeling of space,
and this also served to maintain the ability to divide the space
into numerous product zones, as required.

For the catering areas and nail bars, we used atmospheric
lighting and bold graphics, whilst continuing the base
palette of the ground floor throughout.



These were all designed with social media

in mind, and each area included visual cues

to encourage and inspire interaction,

photography and sharing.

Result
Over 10 days:
44.3k visits
835 bra fittings
1500 action photos for social
2500 customisation trials
8000 nail bar sessions
$109k in revenue (USD)



CALM: Torch Songs

Suicide is the single biggest killer of men
under 45 in the UK. The Campaign Against
Living Miserably (CALM) is dedicated to prevention
by offering a helpline to men in need.

Brief
At the end of 2016 we partnered with CALM
to unite men for this cause and launch a campaign
on International Men’s Day. Our brief was to build a campaign
that would encourage men throughout the UK to take part
in a dialogue and break down the stigma around mental health.

Insights
Male suicide is a prevalent issue in the UK, and it’s the feelings
of shame and weakness associated with issues of mental health
that prevent men reaching out for the vital support they need.


To remove the stigma and to try

and prevent these tragedies, a dialogue

around mental health and wellbeing needs

to be normalized amongst men.

Solution

Torch Songs – songs that guide you out of the dark




Together with CALM, we saw an opportunity to provide a cultural
vehicle to carry the message of hope, as a way to start the necessary
cultural shift. Working with 12 prominent UK male artists, we asked
them to record and share the song that they feel leads them out
of their darkest moments.

In November of 2016 we launched the nationwide 360° campaign,
across OOH and social, and built a digital platform at torchsongs.com
to act as a meeting point for all campaign content, videos,
BTS content and resources.

Artists such as Frank Turner, The Vaccines and Years & Years
recorded their own tracks and shared the songs out across
their own feeds, asking UK males to share their torch songs,
with the call to action #whatsyourtorchsong

Calling upon our network we worked with famed music
photographer Andy Earl to create a series of iconic portraits
of the participating artists, whilst software developer and guru
Eoghan O’Keeffe created unique videos of generative visuals,
which reacted to the tracks.
Result

'We had a combined reach of 1.2m+ people'




Through the social media campaign,
we had a combined reach of 1.2m+ people
and the campaign received international
coverage across publications such as
The Guardian, NME, ID, Dazed & Confused
and The Drum.



Brief
We were tasked with leading this campaign and building
a brand to create a positive cultural shift within
Rwandan culture. Our challenge was to answer the following:
What story could we tell, and in what way, to spread messages
of empowerment to affect positive, lasting behavioural change?

Approach
In all of our work, we take a bottom-up approach to building
tailor-made solutions. For this project, our mission was to listen,
observe and curate the most relevant storytelling methods
to inspire, educate and empower girls to rise from poverty.

After conducting various workshops, and working side-by-side
with local artists, it was clear that to achieve the goals
of this campaign, Ni Nyampinga would demand a radical shift
in design practice from anything that had gone before.
Solution

'Challenge set perceptions
that showcased female role models'




We created a brand identity that borrowed from traditional
craft and injected it with a bold and modern palette
and typeface. We developed guidelines to challenge set
perceptions that showcased female role models, and ensured
the publication offered new skills and advice about education,
sexual health and violence otherwise inaccessible.

While we led the first issue hands on, we mentored a local design
agency to take over the running of the magazine day-to-day.



We challenged them to think conceptually
around the issues presented and bring these
to life by creating a bright, open and inviting
movement all would want to be a part of.




After a year of operation, the campaign received support
from the Rwandan Education Board, and following, we knew
it was time to embrace new tools to further amplify this message.
We engaged with local radio and created a billboard campaign.

This was the biggest test for the branding we had created – was it
iconic and memorable enough for people to instantly recognise?
Result

'Ni Nyampinga is a more widely known brand

than Coca-Cola, with 41% of the local population

engaging with it regularly.'




Not only did we create the first ever colour magazine
in Rwandan history, with circulation sitting at 100,000 copies
printed per issue, but five years on, Ni Nyampinga is a more
widely known brand than Coca-Cola, with 41% of the local
population engaging with it regularly.

As with any successful brand, when momentum becomes
so great, soon comes the time to go ‘in house.’
In 2015, we assisted with the creation of a Ni Nyampinga
house to do this. We worked with a local printing house
and helped organise a government loan to purchase
a press capable of the magazine, and are happy to say
the magazine is now a self-sustaining entity.

As a small industry brag, this project also picked
up a Nike Maxim Award 2012 and was the first
ever non-Nike project to do so.

From the start, the ambition with this campaign was to spur
a hotbed of creativity and training for Rwanda’s girls
and to do ourselves “out of a job.” That we have now done this,
and curated Rwanda’s first girl teen brand for girls,
by girls, is a job well done.



Brief
In early 2015, as part of the global NTC tour,
HarrimanSteel was approached by the Nike Russia team
to produce an original design concept for it's very own
House of Innovation.

This two-storey temporary brand experience and retail space,
on the edges of Moscow's infamous Gorky Park,
needed to host a wide range of participants, from professional
athletes and bloggers, to shoppers and media professionals.

In addition, it needed to function as a multi-purpose space,
featuring a pop-up retail floor, a VIP lounge,
and an exclusive ‘Nike Real Girls’ space with a nail bar,
photo area and café space.
Solution

'Focusing on a high level of detailing

and patterns, and using layering'




Taking inspiration from the Nike product itself, we chose
to use monochrome technical materials and fabrics
for all bespoke fixtures, focusing on a high level
of detailing and patterns, and using layering to exaggerate
the transparency of materials.

To allow the product to shine through, we chose concrete
and monochrome as a minimalist base to create a premium
aesthetic for the entire ground floor which acted
as a dedicated pop-up retail space.

We used transparencies, diffusers and semi-opaque materials
in the fabrication of displays to create a feeling of space,
and this also served to maintain the ability to divide the space
into numerous product zones, as required.

For the catering areas and nail bars, we used atmospheric
lighting and bold graphics, whilst continuing the base
palette of the ground floor throughout.



These were all designed with social media

in mind, and each area included visual cues

to encourage and inspire interaction,

photography and sharing.

Result
Over 10 days:
44.3k visits
835 bra fittings
1500 action photos for social
2500 customisation trials
8000 nail bar sessions
$109k in revenue (USD)



Brief
At the end of 2016 we partnered with CALM
to unite men for this cause and launch a campaign
on International Men’s Day. Our brief was to build a campaign
that would encourage men throughout the UK to take part
in a dialogue and break down the stigma around mental health.

Insights
Male suicide is a prevalent issue in the UK, and it’s the feelings
of shame and weakness associated with issues of mental health
that prevent men reaching out for the vital support they need.


To remove the stigma and to try

and prevent these tragedies, a dialogue

around mental health and wellbeing needs

to be normalized amongst men.

Solution

Torch Songs – songs that guide you out of the dark




Together with CALM, we saw an opportunity to provide a cultural
vehicle to carry the message of hope, as a way to start the necessary
cultural shift. Working with 12 prominent UK male artists, we asked
them to record and share the song that they feel leads them out
of their darkest moments.

In November of 2016 we launched the nationwide 360° campaign,
across OOH and social, and built a digital platform at torchsongs.com
to act as a meeting point for all campaign content, videos,
BTS content and resources.

Artists such as Frank Turner, The Vaccines and Years & Years
recorded their own tracks and shared the songs out across
their own feeds, asking UK males to share their torch songs,
with the call to action #whatsyourtorchsong

Calling upon our network we worked with famed music
photographer Andy Earl to create a series of iconic portraits
of the participating artists, whilst software developer and guru
Eoghan O’Keeffe created unique videos of generative visuals,
which reacted to the tracks.
Result

'We had a combined reach of 1.2m+ people'




Through the social media campaign,
we had a combined reach of 1.2m+ people
and the campaign received international
coverage across publications such as
The Guardian, NME, ID, Dazed & Confused
and The Drum.